1.   The Mourning of Pallas by French artist Anne-Louis Girodet Trioson, 1767-1824.
  The illustration is in pen and brown ink brush with gray and brown wash heightened with white. It is for Book Eleven of The Aeneid and features Aeneas and Lulus mourning Pallas who was killed by the Trojans in battle.
 Acoetës, who had warned of the Trojan Horse, leans over Pallas in mourning while Aeneas comforts Pallas’s son Lulus.
 The illustration is in the Elisha Whittlelsey Collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, New York, USA.

      The Mourning of Pallas by French artist Anne-Louis Girodet Trioson, 1767-1824.

      The illustration is in pen and brown ink brush with gray and brown wash heightened with white. It is for Book Eleven of The Aeneid and features Aeneas and Lulus mourning Pallas who was killed by the Trojans in battle.

     Acoetës, who had warned of the Trojan Horse, leans over Pallas in mourning while Aeneas comforts Pallas’s son Lulus.

     The illustration is in the Elisha Whittlelsey Collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, New York, USA.

  2.  The Plague in Rome also called Blessing the City, 1869, oil on canvas by Jules-Élie Delauney, French academic painter, 1828-1891.
  Delauney painted frescoes at the church of St. Nicholas at Nantes, panels of Apollo, Orpheus and Amphion at the Paris Opera House and 12 paintings for the Council of State at the Palais Royal. His greatest popularity came with the painting above and with his portraits.

     The Plague in Rome also called Blessing the City, 1869, oil on canvas by Jules-Élie Delauney, French academic painter, 1828-1891.

      Delauney painted frescoes at the church of St. Nicholas at Nantes, panels of Apollo, Orpheus and Amphion at the Paris Opera House and 12 paintings for the Council of State at the Palais Royal. His greatest popularity came with the painting above and with his portraits.

  3.  At the Sick Man’s Door, pencil, watercolor and bodycolor with gum arabic, by Frederick Walker, British, 1840-1875.
 Illustration for William Makepeace Thackeray’s serialized novel, Phillip on His Way Through the World, in The Cornhill Magazine,  London, 1861-1862. Thackeray did a few illustrations himself, but soon took Walker as his protegé. Walker created woodcuts and full page watercolor illustrations for the story.

     At the Sick Man’s Door, pencil, watercolor and bodycolor with gum arabic, by Frederick Walker, British, 1840-1875.

     Illustration for William Makepeace Thackeray’s serialized novel, Phillip on His Way Through the World, in The Cornhill Magazine,  London, 1861-1862. Thackeray did a few illustrations himself, but soon took Walker as his protegé. Walker created woodcuts and full page watercolor illustrations for the story.

  4. luxoccultapress:

The Damned - Alexander Mair (1605)

    luxoccultapress:

    The Damned - Alexander Mair (1605)

    (via baffomet)

  5.  The Satyr and the Peasant Family, 1662, oil on canvas by Jan Steen, Dutch, 1626-1679. The Getty Center, Los Angeles, California, USA.
  A satyr was a mythical, lustful, drunken woodland god. The Roman satyr had a goat’s appearance while the Greek satyr resembled a horse.
  This painting was first the property of the Philippston family of Brussels, Belgium. It was looted by the Nazis and later purchased by the Getty Museum and then owned by the museum in an agreement with the family in 2003.
  Steen was noted as a colorist and painter of children. He specialized in portraits and historical and mythological scenes.

     The Satyr and the Peasant Family, 1662, oil on canvas by Jan Steen, Dutch, 1626-1679. The Getty Center, Los Angeles, California, USA.

      A satyr was a mythical, lustful, drunken woodland god. The Roman satyr had a goat’s appearance while the Greek satyr resembled a horse.

      This painting was first the property of the Philippston family of Brussels, Belgium. It was looted by the Nazis and later purchased by the Getty Museum and then owned by the museum in an agreement with the family in 2003.

      Steen was noted as a colorist and painter of children. He specialized in portraits and historical and mythological scenes.

  6.    Die Gartenlaube (The Garden Arbor) or The Burial of Atala, 1885, by Gustave  Claude Étienne Courtois, French academic artist, 1852-1923.
  The scene is from Atala, an early novella François-René de  Chateaubriand, which was adapted to the stage and translated into many languages.
  Atala falls in love with Chactas, but cannot marry him because of her vow of chastity. In her grief, she takes poison and before either Chactas or the missionary can save her, she dies. Here the missionary waits to receive her from Chactas to put her in her grave.

       Die Gartenlaube (The Garden Arbor) or The Burial of Atala, 1885, by Gustave  Claude Étienne Courtois, French academic artist, 1852-1923.

      The scene is from Atala, an early novella François-René de  Chateaubriand, which was adapted to the stage and translated into many languages.

      Atala falls in love with Chactas, but cannot marry him because of her vow of chastity. In her grief, she takes poison and before either Chactas or the missionary can save her, she dies. Here the missionary waits to receive her from Chactas to put her in her grave.

  7. beksinskislaboratory:

Zdzisław Beksiński - No title, 1974. Oil on hardboard.

    beksinskislaboratory:

    Zdzisław Beksiński - No title, 1974. Oil on hardboard.

    (via sevenchalices)

  8.  Marriage à la Mode, Plate 6, The Lady’s Death, 1743, oil on canvas by William Hogarth, British, 1697-1764.
 The young bride has turned into an older wife with a child being treated for the disease she inherited from her unfaithful parents. The Countess has committed suicide with an overdose of laudanum and the empty bottle lies on the floor.
 The miserly father of the Countess removes her wedding ring and, in the cheaply furnished room, the starving dog at the right symbolizes her state of mind. There are many different ways to starve.
  Hogarth was known for painting, print making, illustrations, engraving and etchings and all filled with symbolism. 

     Marriage à la Mode, Plate 6, The Lady’s Death, 1743, oil on canvas by William Hogarth, British, 1697-1764.

     The young bride has turned into an older wife with a child being treated for the disease she inherited from her unfaithful parents. The Countess has committed suicide with an overdose of laudanum and the empty bottle lies on the floor.

     The miserly father of the Countess removes her wedding ring and, in the cheaply furnished room, the starving dog at the right symbolizes her state of mind. There are many different ways to starve.

      Hogarth was known for painting, print making, illustrations, engraving and etchings and all filled with symbolism. 

  9.  Marriage à la Mode, Plate 5, The Bagnio, 1743, oil on canvas by William Hogarth, British, 1697-1764.
 The Earl, who is fatally wounded, has caught his wife with her lover, the lawyer. The killer makes his way out of the bagnio in his nightshirt.  A bagnio is a sort of inn and boarding house where rooms can be rented for a short time.  The Countess pleads with the dying Earl to forgive her indiscretions, and the masks on the floor indicate they have been to a masquerade, which could mirror their marriage.
 Hogarth’s Marriage à la Mode is comprised of six plates from the couple’s ill-conceived marriage to the suicide of the Countess.  

     Marriage à la Mode, Plate 5, The Bagnio, 1743, oil on canvas by William Hogarth, British, 1697-1764.

     The Earl, who is fatally wounded, has caught his wife with her lover, the lawyer. The killer makes his way out of the bagnio in his nightshirt.  A bagnio is a sort of inn and boarding house where rooms can be rented for a short time.  The Countess pleads with the dying Earl to forgive her indiscretions, and the masks on the floor indicate they have been to a masquerade, which could mirror their marriage.

     Hogarth’s Marriage à la Mode is comprised of six plates from the couple’s ill-conceived marriage to the suicide of the Countess.  

  10.  Marriage à la Mode, Plate 1 of 6, 1743, oil on canvas by William Hogarth, British, 1697-1764. National Gallery, London.
 This is already an unhappy marriage between the daughter of a rich and miserly merchant and the son of an impoverished Earl. The theme follows John Dryden’s comedy of the same name.
 The Earl points to his lineage from William the Conqueror as his unfinished building, because of lack of money, shows through the window. The gold in front of him is from the new wife’s dowry, and his foot is wrapped because of gout from rich foods and high living.
 The bride and groom sit together at the left. He looks to the side as she twiddles her wedding ring on a handkerchief. Her attorney, Silvertongue, whispers in her ear as he is likely to do when the two eventually become lovers.
 Two dogs, male and female and chained together, sit at their feet.  The walls are covered with Old Masters depicting scenes of martyrdom and a screaming Gorgon’s head.
  There is almost no end to the symbolism and allegory used by Hogarth to tell this story. 

     Marriage à la Mode, Plate 1 of 6, 1743, oil on canvas by William Hogarth, British, 1697-1764. National Gallery, London.

     This is already an unhappy marriage between the daughter of a rich and miserly merchant and the son of an impoverished Earl. The theme follows John Dryden’s comedy of the same name.

     The Earl points to his lineage from William the Conqueror as his unfinished building, because of lack of money, shows through the window. The gold in front of him is from the new wife’s dowry, and his foot is wrapped because of gout from rich foods and high living.

     The bride and groom sit together at the left. He looks to the side as she twiddles her wedding ring on a handkerchief. Her attorney, Silvertongue, whispers in her ear as he is likely to do when the two eventually become lovers.

     Two dogs, male and female and chained together, sit at their feet.  The walls are covered with Old Masters depicting scenes of martyrdom and a screaming Gorgon’s head.

      There is almost no end to the symbolism and allegory used by Hogarth to tell this story. 

About

Many classical writers and artists explored misty shades and shadows of the supernatural. Others chronicled myths and legends.
This is a collection of writers and artists who illustrated these dark themes.

For a lighter side, visit www.athousandwinds.tumblr.com

AUTHORS AND ARTISTS:
· Adolf Hiremy Hirschl
· Adolph von Menzel
· Adriaen Brouwer
· Adriaen van de Venne
· Albert Ludovici
· Albert Welti
· Albrecht Durer
· Alessandro Magnasco
· Alexander Litovchenko
· Alexander Nasmyth
· Alexander Ver Huell
· Alexandre Cabanel
· 
Alexandre Colin
· Alfred Elmore
· Alfred Stevens
· Allegory
· Anders Zorn
· Angelica Kauffmann
· Anonymous
· Antoine Wiertz
· Anton Pieck
· Arnold Bocklin
· Artur Grottger
· Arthur Hacker
· Arthur Hughes
· Arthur Rackham
· August Bromse
· Auguste Raffet
· Augustus Leopold Egg
· Augustus Mulready
· Austin Osman Spare
· Benigne Gagneraux
· 
Biblical Themes
· Book Covers
· Book of Hours
· Bram Stoker
· Briton Riviere
· Camille Corot
· Caravaggio
· Carl Herpfer
· Carlos Schwabe
· Caspar David Friedrich
· Cemetery Sculptures
· Charles Deas
· Charles Dickens
· Charles Doyle
· Charles Landseer
· Charlotte Bronte
· Charon
· Consolation
· Crypts
· Dance of Death
· Daniel Maclise
· Dante Rossetti
· David Teniers the Younger
· Divine Comedy
· Domenico Feti
· Dreams
· Druids
· Edgar Allan Poe
· Edmund Blair Leighton
· Edmund Dulac
· Edouard Cibot
· Edouard Manet
· Edouard Rosset Granger
· Edvard Munch
· Edward Bulwer Lytton
· Edward Burne Jones
· Edward Gorey
· Edward Matthew Ward
· Edwin Landseer
· Egbert van der Poel
· Egyptian Themes
· Elihu Vedder
· Emanuel Leutze
· Emily Bronte
· Ernst Ferdinand Oehme
· Erskine Nicol
· Eugene Delacroix
· Eugene Grasset
· Evelyn de Morgan
· Executions
· Fear
· Ferdinand Waldmuller
· F.H. Townsend
· Fire
· Firs Zhuravlev
· Folklore
· Francesco Guardi
· Francis Danby
· Francisco deZurburan
· Francisco Goya
· Francois Biard
· Frank Dicksee
· Frank Holl
· Frederic George Cotman
· Frederick Coffay Yohn
· Frederick Lord Leighton
· Frederick Walker
· Gabriel Max
· Gaston Leroux
· George Bernard O'Neill
· George DuMaurier
· George Elgar Hicks
· George Frederick Watts
· Georges de Latour
· Ghosts
· Girodet Trioson
· 
Giovanni Baglione
· Gustave Courbet
· Gustave Courtois
· Gustave Dore
· Hans Baldung Grien
· Hans Holbein the Younger
· Hansom cab
· Harper's Weekly
· Harrison Ainsworth
· Haunted Places
· Heinrich Burkel
· Henri Latour
· Henri Regnault
· Henry Courtney Selous
· Henry Fuseli
· Henry James
· Herbert Dicksee
· Herbert Draper
· Hieronymous Bosch
· Horace Vernet
· Howard Pyle
· Hughes Merle
· Hugo Simberg
· Ilya Repin
· Image
· Ireland
· Isle of the Dead
· Ivan Aivazovsky
· Jack the Ripper
· Jacques Callot
· Jakub Schikaneder
· James Tissot
· James William Carling
· Jan Beerstraten
· Jan Brueghel
· Jan Steen
· Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres
· Jean Baptiste Corot
· Jean Beraud
· Jean Francois Millet
· Jean Gericault
· Jean Leon Gerome
· Jean Paul Laurens
· Johan Malmstrom
· Johann Von Goethe
· John Atkinson Grimshaw
· John Baptist de Medina
· John Buchan
· John Collier
· John Downman
· John Martin
· John Edmund Buckley
· John Everett Millais
· John Milton
· John Singleton Copley
· John William Waterhouse
· Joseph Farquharson
· Joseph M.W. Turner
· Joseph Sattler
· Joseph Sheridan LeFanu
· Juan de Valdes Leal
· Karl Blechen
· Karl Briullov
· Karl Diefenbach
· Klavdy Lebedev
· Konstantin Flavitsky
· Konstantin Makovsky
· Laszlo Mednyanszky
· Lee Brown Coye
· Legends
· Lenore
· Leon Bonnat
· Leon Wyczolkowski
· Leonardo da Vinci
· Louisa May Alcott
· Louis Boulanger
· Louis Gallait
· Louis Janmot
· Louis Leopold Boilly
· Lucas Cranach
· Lucas van Leyden
· Lucas van Uden
· Lucien Levy Dhurmer
· Luis Ricardo Falero
· McGuffey's Readers
· Magic
· Mary Roberts Rinehart
· Matthew Gregory Lewis
· Matthias Stomer
· Maximilian Pirner
· Max Klinger
· Michelangelo
· Mihaly Zichy
· Modest Mussorgsky
· Mourning
· Murder
· Mysteries
· Mystics
· Myths
· Nathaniel Hawthorne
· Nicolaes Berchem
· Nicholas Poussin
· Oddities
· Odilon Redon
· Operas
· Oscar Wilde
· Paul Albert Besnard
· Paul Delaroche
· Peter Claesz
· Peter Paul Rubens
· Philip Burne Jones
· Philip Wouwerman
· Phyllis Chesler
· Pieter Bruegel
· Plague
· Poetry
· 
Pompeii
· 
Randolph Schwabe
· Ray Bradbury
· Resurrectionists
· Richard Redgrave
· Richard Wagner
· Robert Bloch
· Robert Draper
· Robert Lewis Stevenson
· Robert William Buss
· Rogelio de Equsquiza
· Rudyard Kipling
· Samuel Luke Fildes
· Samuel Prout
· Samuel Woodforde
· Sandor Liezen Mayer
· Sculpture
· Serafino Macchiati
· Sherlock Holmes
· Shirley Jackson
· Solitude
· Sorrow
· Spiritualism
· Strand Magazine
· Suicides
· Susan Hill
· Suspense
· Tavik Frantisek Simon
· Theodor Kittlesen
· Theodore Gericault
· Thomas Brooks
· Thomas Faed
· Thomas Hardy
· Thomas Jones Barker
· Thomas Rowlandson
· Titian
· Tragedy
· Ulpiano Checa
· Vanitas
· Vasily Grigorevich Perov
· Victoriana
· Viktor Vasnetsov
· Vincent Van Gogh
· Walter Crane
· Walter Langley
· Walter Scott
· War
· Washington Irving
· Wilhelm Kotarbinsky
· Wilkie Collins
· William Bouguereau
· William H. Ainsworth
· William Holman Hunt
· William Blake
· William Brassey Hole
· William Frith
· William Hamilton
· William Hogarth
· William MacGeorge
· William Mulready
· William Shakespeare
· William Strang
· Witchcraft
· Witold Pruszkowski
· Xavier Mellery